Humor in the classroom

As a Training Specialist humor is the best medicine and I do feel it’s important to add laughter to any presentation for any variety of audience members. It breaks up the monotony and boredom that is expected in a lecture within a training facility. Is it okay to add a joke or two during your presentation? Absolutely! I’ve had experiences where I inserted some funny incidents that happened to me and it lifted the mood in the classroom. They felt more at ease and even participated in an exchange of funny past times. Although you do need to keep a sense of control within the classroom setting so the class stays focused. That’s the one thing I had to take control of. It ‘s important to keep the disciplines consistent in using humor sparingly and in relation to the learning curriculum. Caution should e noted when you have those students who regard their education very high and simply do not find humor appropriate within a learning relm. Check out the rest of this article using humor in the classroom.

http://blogs.adobe.com/captivate/2011/10/make-em-laugh-is-comedy-appropriate-in-elearning.html#comments

 

Becoming an ID

 I attached Jeffrey’s blog as he discusses helpful sites about Instructional Design that provide ideas to those of us who are new to blogging like myself. The iddblog.org is  a great way to identify with other designers who share their input and ideas on  topics and more. One in particular was by Ashanti Morgan who discusses  how designers looking for purposeful ways in developing proper content, strategic student interactions, and consistent course material. As ID’s we need to keep up with current information on effective online experiences that require mutual communities that engage and construct meaning to the framework of learning experiences involving three elements of social, cognitive, and teaching presence. Read more as she discusses and illustrates the community of inquiry lisitng the three elements.

  http://www.iddblog.org/?p=841

I’m new to WordPress but I’m finding various blogs attached to it in reference to outcomes of instruction, learningcommunities and more.  http://en.wordpress.com/tag/instructional-design/

One in particular by Nicole Legault, provides 15 inspirational certificates to design in collaboration with a Learning Management System (LMS) which we have acquired in our organization. I found this blog interesting because we’ve had so many presentations needing certification upon completion of the online courses in order to give everyone credit for completion and to keep a hard copy in their educational folders for future reference. Yes, most of the time the certificate is processed through the LMS system at the end of the course that will alert the person ‘Congratulations on completing this course, please click to print out your certificate’. The certificate is legitimate but rather boring. This blog shares new features you can use in preparation for future certificates whether they’re within an LMS system or simply a training program for your organization. I think it would boost morale in encouraging staff to complete their eLearning requirements.

http://flirtingwelearning.wordpress.com/2011/11/08/15-certificate-designs-for-your-inspiration/